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Cinco de Mayo Folk Dancing

Cinco de Mayo Folk Dancing

Few people in English North America are aware that the celebration of CINCO de Mayo commemorates the Battle of Puebla against the French, and not the Mexican Independence from Spain.  Although a celebration in its own right, it is definitely not as important for Mexicans as the celebration of Las Fiestas Patrias in September.

Some of you might be wondering how the French came to invade Mexico and how, in just a few years, left their mark in our cuisine.  It is always a surprise when in my cooking classes, I sometimes include crepes as part of the menu.  It is hard to associate the very French crepes with Mexican food, until I mention that I grew up having savory or sweet crepes as part of our meals.

It all began with napoleon III, Napoleon Bonaparte’s nephew who as soon as he was settled in his role as Emperor of France, began to dream about creating an empire in Mexico.  That exotic and far away country seemed like the perfect place to appoint a catholic European prince.

In Europe at the time, according to many Mexicans living there in exile, the current Mexican government had not been functioning well as a republic, proof of which was the civil war that had devastated Mexico for almost 40 years.  In their mind Mexico needed a change and a monarchy appeared to be the perfect solution to end the war.  After all, Spain had ruled Mexico for more than 300 years.

It was not only the French who had their eyes set in Mexico, but the English and the Spaniards as well.  They all  had their own reasons to invade Mexico and in January of 1862, the first naval squadron landed in the port of Veracruz, only to find the Spanish flag in the fortress of San Juan de Ulúa.

Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (Napoleon III)

Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (Napoleon III)

Meanwhile back in France, it was not very difficult for Napoleon III to find a suitable regent for the soon to be conquered Mexico.  Ferdinand Maximilian of Hapsburg, the younger brother of Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, whom simply seemed to be a liability to his brother and did not have an appropriate position in the courts, was the perfect candidate.

The Archduke Maximilian was married to Charlotte, daughter of King Leopold of Belgium who had her own dreams of becoming an empress herself.  Their idle life in the castle of Miramar had become boring and they both began to entertain the idea of ruling a country, far away from the intrigues of the European courts.

Soon after, Spain realized that her hopes of recovering their former colony was starting to vanish pretty quickly, and the English who were merely trying to collect a debt, had lost interest as well.  The French army was at this point, free to invade Mexico, but as soon as they started to trek into the hills, the tropical climate of the state of Veracruz began claiming the lives of the soldiers.  The beautiful city of Orizaba, a beautiful hill town between Veracruz and Mexico City, with its coffee plantations, tropical gardens and the majestic Pico de Orizaba, proved to be a most welcome sight.  However, along with the warm climate came malaria and other illnesses that were not part of their master plan.

Battle of Puebla on Cinco de Mayo

Nevertheless, the army continued its incursion into Mexican soil, arriving at the city of Puebla where each church had become a fort and where more that 4,000 Mexicans in shabby uniforms fighting with obsolete guns, defeated the finest European soldiers on the famous battle of CINCO de Mayo, 1862.  Unfortunately, this glorious moment was short lived, and the French army continued towards Mexico City where President Juárez had already fled the capital.

The French army commanded by General Achilles Bazaine entered Mexico City on June 7, 1863.  By this time the people were tired of the uncertainty prevalent in those days and welcomed the French troops with marked enthusiasm.  Soon after, in August of 1863, the Mexicans accepted an empire, and the following year Maximilian and Charlotte landed in Veracruz in May of 1864.  Maximilian and his 23 year old wife Charlotte ruled Mexico until February of 1867, when Maximilian fled the capital for Querétaro, and was later executed as a foreign usurper, on June 19, 1867.

The events that led to this tragic moment in the history of Mexico are too long to tell in this article and should be told in greater detail. 

 The French intervention had a strong influence on everyday life.   It created a new and enriched cuisine, especially in the capital of the country.  Many years passed before people went back to serving indigenous ingredients such as the very Mexican nopalitos (cactus pads).  This cactus leaf is nothing short of a miracle plant, as nutritionists and scientists have since discovered astounding characteristics in this unpretentious vegetable.  Extensively and imaginatively used in prehispanic and contemporary Mexican cuisine, there are now more than 150 different ways of cooking nopalitos.  Please see the recipe below for a delicious

Cactus Pad Soup or Sopa de Nopalitos

2 large ripe tomatoes, seeded

1/4 medium onion chopped

2 large cloves garlic, peeled

1 tbsp. vegetable oil

1/4 cup tomato sauce

1 tbsp. chicken bouillon mix

Two – 15 oz Tender Cactus Nopales jars

1 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen

1 to 2 canned chipotle chiles,

1 tsp. chipotle adobo

1 cup cubed Oaxaca or Monterey Jack cheese

In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatoes, onion, garlic, and process until puréed.  In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat and add the tomato mixture, tomato sauce, and chicken boullion.  Bring the sauce to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer for 5 to 8 minutes, or until the sauce thickens slightly.

Add the broth to the tomato sauce and correct seasoning.  Add the cactus pads, corn kernels, chipotle chiles, and the adobo. Simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, and serve hot with the cubed cheese.

Mexican Culinary Treasures: Recipes From Maria Elena's Kitchen

Mexican Culinary Treasures: Recipes From Maria Elena's Kitchen

Maria Elena Cuervo-Lorens is the author of Mexican Culinary Treasures cookbook. She takes you back to her childhood, spent around her grandmother’s table on a shopping expedition with her mother to Mercado La Merced, and for a merienda (snack) of café con leche and biscochos (Mexican sweet rolls) at a bakery in downtown Mexico City. The authentic Mexican recipes she shares with us include tacos, quesadillas and enchiladas. The nouvelle cuisine of cosmopolitan Mexico City, such as cuitlacoche (huitlacohe) crepes, oysters with chipotle chile,

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Pozole comes in Red, White and Green.

Pozole, a heartening soup and a favorite dish for people coming out late in the evening from the theater or a nightclub or, better, to cure a terrible hangover, originated in the state of Jalisco, where they use pork instead of chicken. Here’s a little more history:

  • Background: Pre-Hispanic origin, prepared with cacahuazintle corn, pork meat, chicken and/or shrimp. Serves with vegetables, or you can make an all vegetarian version by excluding protein.
  • Red Pozole: Is typical of Sinaloa and Jalisco, usually prepared with chile guajillo salsa.
  • White Pozole: Is more popular in Central Mexico.
  • Green Pozole: Originates in the state of Guerrero, where it’s color comes from a tomatillo salsa. In some regions they add sardines, egg and chicharron.

The spicy combination of the ancho and guajillo chiles with the tomato, oregano, and cloves turns an ordinary chicken broth into the most flavorful broth for the hominy corn.

Pozole is really what we call a plato fuerte or main dish, when served with lots of chicken and all its trimmings. This recipe can be found on pg. 69 of Mexican Culinary Treasures.

RED POZOLE WITH CHICKEN
Pozole Rojo

1 whole chicken breast
1 chicken backbone
2 chicken wings
3 dried Guajillo chiles
2 dried Ancho chiles
2 large tomatoes
2 cloves garlic
¼ cup chopped onion
½ tsp. oregano
½ cup tomato sauce
1 tsp. vegetable oil
4 to 5 chicken cups chicken broth
2 (900 g) cans hominy corn*, drained
Salt
6-8 corn tortillas, fried until crisp (tostadas)
Garnishes:
Chopped radishes, finely chopped lettuce, finely chopped onion, avocado slices, ground piquín chile, and quartered limes.

In 6 cups of salted boiling water, cook the chicken breast and backbone for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the chicken breast is tender. Reserving the broth, drain, remove the skin and bone, and shred the chicken breast with your fingers. Set aside, discarding the backbone and the wings.

While the chicken is cooking, stem the chiles, shake out the seeds, and wash them under running water. Soak the chiles in 1 cup of the reserved chicken broth for about 15 minutes, or until soft. Transfer the chiles with the soaking liquid to a blender and process with the tomatoes, garlic, onion and oregano until puréed.

In a soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat and fry the chile mixture for 3 to 4 minutes before adding the tomato sauce, the remaining chicken broth, hominy corn, salt to taste, and the shredded chicken. Bring the soup to a boil and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes longer to allow the flavours to mix.

Divide the pozole between soup bowls and serve hot, with the tostadas. Let everyone add their choice of garnish to their own bowl.

Mexican Culinary Treasures: Recipes From Maria Elena's Kitchen

Mexican Culinary Treasures: Recipes From Maria Elena's Kitchen

Maria Elena Cuervo-Lorens is the author of Mexican Culinary Treasures cookbook. She takes you back to her childhood, spent around her grandmother’s table on a shopping expedition with her mother to Mercado La Merced, and for a merienda (snack) of café con leche and biscochos (Mexican sweet rolls) at a bakery in downtown Mexico City. The authentic Mexican recipes she shares with us include tacos, quesadillas and enchiladas. The nouvelle cuisine of cosmopolitan Mexico City, such as cuitlacoche (huitlacohe) crepes, oysters with chipotle chile.

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Mexican Candy & Snacks Buffet

Whether you’re celebrating a party or a get together to watch your favorite game on TV, we bring you a new concept of creating the Ultimate Mexican Candy and Snacks Buffet for your guests.

A buffet as it’s defined, is “a system of serving meals in which food is placed in a public area where the diners generally serve themselves. It is a popular method for feeding a large number of people with minimal staff.” Okay, so that’s what it means, but can you WOW! your guests? That’s what I’m positive you’re looking for. Traditionally, we think of buffets for a complete meal or for desserts, but what about the goodies, fruits and snacks with a Mexican flair. Your guests will love this! Check out the video on how we have our setup:

As you will notice, we have chosen a variety of mexican candy, fruits, snacks and chips (most of which you can find on our store if you need them delivered right to your home). Below is a list of the items, but you’re always welcome to choose whatever you like. Make them sweet, make them sour, make them crunch or spicy hot, make them healthy concious, make them colorful, make them simple. It’s real Mexican, real simple and really good.

Below is another picture for the layout of your buffet counter:

Mexican Candy & Snacks Buffet Layout

Enjoy! And please share with us in the comment below what your ultimate Mexican candy and Snacks buffet would have for your favorite guests.

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Consumers seeking for "authenticity" in Mexican dining.
Special Article Contribution by Kathleen Furore

The new Ethnic Food & Beverage Consumer Trends Report from Technomic Inc., a Chicago-based market research firm, was full of interesting information about consumers’ preferences in ethnic cuisine. The finding that most intrigued me: only about one-fourth of people polled are satisfied with restaurants’ selection of ethnic foods. That included just 23 percent of consumers speaking about limited-service chains and 28 percent about full-service brands.

If those consumers are unhappy with selections of Mexican food specifically I have to admit I’m a bit surprised, considering how significantly Mexican food has evolved since I started covering the industry in 1997—the year el Restaurante Mexicano magazine debuted.

Consumers responding to the Technomic survey said they want more “authenticity” in the ethnic cuisine they’re consuming. And that is exactly what Mexican restaurants today are striving to provide. From taquerias and food trucks to fast food chains and sit-down family restaurants to fine dining chains and single-unit independents alike, chefs are reaching beyond the nachos, ground beef tacos and melted cheese-drenched enchiladas that once prevailed on U.S. Mexican menus.

Examples of the authentic food these establishments are serving:

Puesto Mexican Street FoodTaco stand/fast-casual eatery: At Puesto Mexican Street Food, a restaurant in La Jolla, Calif., that is modeled after a Mexico City taco stand, customers enjoy homemade salsas prepared fresh daily and tortillas made on-site from stone ground maize. The menu focuses on guisados (grilled foods) that include fish, shrimp, chicken al pastor, carne asada and gourmet Mexican vegetarian items like zucchini flower, corn truffle and soy chorizo potatoes.

Rubios Mexican Fast FoodFast food chain: Rubios, famous for its fish tacos, features a Mango Habanero Pacific Mahi Mahi taco. The fish is seasoned in olive oil and garlic or house blackened, then grilled on an authentic comal and topped with mango pineapple salsa, a smoky red chile sauce made with guajillo, ancho and red jalapeño chiles, crema and serrano cabbage slaw.

Rosa MexicanoFine dining chain: Rosa Mexicano debuted in New York City in 1984. Back then New York Magazine applauded the restaurant for introducing New Yorkers to a “hitherto unfamiliar, elevated version of Mexican cuisine.” Today, Rosa Mexicano serves “contemporary Mexican cuisine rooted in authentic flavors utilizing socially responsible ingredients combined with stylish spaces and festive atmosphere” at its 15 locations (with one scheduled to open in San Francisco soon). Upscale menu items include ceviches such as Camarones (Rock Shrimp) with sweet mango, pineapple, heirloom tomato, mint, toasted pumpkin seeds and chile pasilla-avocado sauce; Tablones (Tequila Braised Short Ribs) with Mestiza sauce (tomatillo-tomato-chipotle) and rajas (slow-cooked Mexican peppers); and the Cochinita Pibil (Yucatan Baked Pork Shoulder) that has been on the menu since 1984.

Babita MexicuisineFine dining, single-unit independent: Babita Mexicuisine, owned and operated by Chef Roberto Berrelleza, specializes in the kind of gourmet Mexican fare often found in Mexico City. Popular dishes at this San Gabriel, Calif., restaurant include Chiles en Nogada, Lamb Shank Mixiote and the classic Chile Relleno Oaxaqueno along with unique culinary creations such as the award-winning Shrimp “Topolobampo” in a super hot habanero, mustard, tomato and white wine sauce and the Chicken and Shrimp “Elba” sautéed in tequila, banana-chipotle sauce and served over chayote gratin. Chef Roberto prepares every dish, using such unique ingredients as zucchini blossoms, cuitlacoche, prickly pear and guamuchil.

Those are just a few of myriad restaurants answering consumers’ calls for authentic ethnic cuisine. Based on my experience covering the food and beverage industry—and on the fact that the Mexican restaurant segment is experiencing higher growth rates than the industry overall—I am confident chefs will continue to innovate as Mexican cuisine in the U.S. continues to evolve.

See Related Articles:
Restaurant Reviews: Xoco (by Rick Bayless) in Chicago, IL

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I discovered Cherimoya (Chair-ee-moya) one day as I was looking at a list of fruit in season. Recognizing every fruit listed but this one, of course, my interest was sparked to do some research. Finding an article that called this the “Ice Cream Fruit” drew me in further. The fruit looks like a cross-pollination between an artichoke and an avocado… oval,  with a smooth or slightly tuberculated skin. The fruit flesh is white and creamy, and has numerous dark brown seeds embedded in it.  According to one article, “Some characterize the flavor as a blend of banana, pineapple, papaya, peach, and strawberry. Others describe it as tasting like commercial bubblegum. ” which is probably the reason why Mark Twain called the cherimoya “the most delicious fruit known to men.”

Unfortunately, you won’t find this treasure on the shelf of your local Whole Foods Market. Though grown throughout Central and North America (even making it up to growers in California), the soft skin and short season of this fruit makes it hard to produce commercially. After doing a little search for it myself, I found it online for $15 a fruit! Despite it’s rarity, the cherimoya’s popularity in the U.S. and Mexico is growing. There’s even a Cherimoya Fair held in Irvine, Ca (and a website dedicated to the fruit, too: cherimoya.com).

And it’s no wonder, though the flavor could sell itself, the cherimoya has multiple health benefits too.

  • “100 g of fresh fruit pulp provide about 75 calories. It contains, however, no saturated fats or cholesterol. It characteristically contains a good amount of dietary fiber (3 g per100 g) that helps prevent absorption of cholesterol in the gut.
  • Cherimoya contains several poly-phenolic antioxidants. Among them, the most prominent in annona family fruits are Annonaceous acetogenins. Acetogenin compounds such as asimicin, bullatacinare…etc are powerful cytotoxins and have been found to have anti-cancer, anti-malarial, and anti-helminthes properties.
  • It is very good in vitamin-C.
  • In addition, cherimoya fruit is a good source of B-complex vitamins, especially vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine). 100 g fresh fruit provides 0.257 mg or 20% of daily-recommended levels. Pyridoxine helps keep-up GABA neuro chemical in the brain. High GABA levels calm down nervous irritability, tension, and headache ailments.Further, it has a well balanced sodium-potassium ratio. A good potassium level in the body helps control heart rate and blood pressure; thus, counters the bad influences of sodium. It also contains more minerals weight per weight than many common fruits like apples, rich in copper, magnesium, iron and manganese.”

    I don’t know about you, but I’m impressed. Looks like I’ll be ordering some cherimoya very soon.

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    En un cacerola derrita la inercia, la amargura y el tedio. Unte bien con mucha risa, especialmente sobre las propias tragedias. En bol aparte, pele y corte en tiras la ansiedad, pique fino el egoísmo. Ponga en remojo el yo hasta que se macere, pero cuide de no derretirlo enteramente.
    El rencor (que es furia rancia) aplástelo contra una tabla, troce el reproche y la envidia. Tire a la basura el pellejo, la pereza para pensar, la vanidad de no cometer errores y la cobardía de no admitirlos. Deje largo rato bajo la canilla, hasta que se vayan por el sumidero, el remordimiento por el pasado, la culpabilidad por el presente y el miedo por el futuro. Amase todo con ternura, sin ahorrar algún gramo de locura.
    No se preocupe si tarda en ablandarse: la impaciencia no es compatible con la ternura. Sazone con la defensa de algún derecho, propio, y sobre todo ajeno. Cocine al fuego lento de la pasión, pero vigile que no se queme. Para decorar, use armonía con la existencia y distribuya en la fuente combinando imaginación y lucidez. Deje reposar dos horas (o veinte años) y sirvalo con mucho amor.

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    Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe es una de las grandes milagrosas aparaciones de la tan renombrada por la religión Católica Romana “Virgen María”. El 9 de Diciembre de 1531 cuenta la historia que un indio llamado Juan Diego mientras caminaba hacia la Ciudad de México vió en el Monte Tepeyac la visión de una niña de aproximadamente 15  o 16 años de edad. Cuando el Indio se acercó afirmó que era La Virgen de Guadalupe la que se encontraba ahí. La Virgen en el lenguaje natal Náhuatl le dijo a Juan Diego que una iglesia debía ser edificada sobre el suelo que pisaban. Inmediatamente el Indio fué a comunicarle al Fray Juan De Zumárraga. El Fray  no le creyó al instante y le pidió que confirmara que en realidad era La Virgen la que le había hablado. Cuando el Fray y el Indio regresaron al Monte Tepeyac La Virgen estaba ahí y les pidio que reunieran flores, un estilo de flor muy peculiar que en ésa época no se encontraba en La Ciudad de México. El Indio tomó su manto y La Virgen reunion las flores. Juan Diego con las flores en el manto lo tomó y las flores cayeron. El día 12 de Diciembre el Indio y el Fray presenciaron la aparición de la Virgen de Guadalupe sobre el manto de el Indio Juan Diego. Milagrosamente al despejar las flores de el manto apareció la famosa imagen sobre el manto, manto que se encuentra en la Basílica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe en la famosa Ciudad de México.

    El pueblo Mexicano y sudamericano celebra el 12 de Diciembre la conmemoración y adoración a la Virgen de Guadalupe. Las celebraciones consisten en miles de peregrinaciones desde diferentes estados de la República Mexicana y Centroamérica hacia la Basílica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe.

    En México La Virgen es el ícono más fuerte y más reconocido por la Religión Católica. El 12 de Diciembre se celebra el día de la “Patrona de México” La Virgen de Guadalupe.

    Imagen de Sumandoluz.com

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    The winter holiday brings a season of festivities, friends, and food. I LOVE this holiday season, who doesn’t? And MexGrocer is here to help your party planning all the way. You know we sell food, but our website also features recipes and sells decor too! Here’s something to get your inspiration kick-started for your next fiesta:

    Choose your menu

    Most of these recipes are a breeze to prepare –  but only you need to know how easy! Impress your friends with a delicious spread of finger foods, and the stand-by staple: chips and guacamole! Click a name for the full recipe details.

    Killer Chile Rellenos

    Chiles rellenos are made of Chile Poblano (Ancho)or Anaheim chiles, with skins removed, dipped in batter, stuffed with cheese or meat and covered  with lightly spiced red sauce.

    Queso Fundido – Mexican Fondue

    This is always popular at parties. Serve with tortilla chips or roll up some of the dip in a warm tortilla.

    Guacamole Mixtec Style

    Guacamole is a spicy Mexican paste made from crushed avocado and various seasonings, usually including onions, peppers, garlic and tomatoes.

    Set the soundtrack

    No party is a party without some music! Here are a few of our favorite tunes sure to get the party moving:

    Bamboleo by Gipsy Kings

    Cool and catchy with a strong vocal

    La Marea by Manu Chao

    Lively and busy – great fun with friends

    Plan party game
    Forget pin-the-tail, play a couple of party games that get your guests up and moving!

    Fiesta Flash

    Here’s a great idea for a simple game to play with mates – all you need is a camera with a self-timer and a few ‘up-for-it’ friends!

    Number of players? As many as you have!

    Who can play? This one’s for everyone – especially the camera shy!

    What’s needed? A camera with a flash and self-timer (most digital cameras and some disposable cameras have both – just check first!)

    What’s the gist?
    1. Grab the camera, set the self-timer and the game begins.
    2. Each player must hold the camera at arm’s length and point it at themselves for a second or two – before passing it on to their left.
    3. Keep going, until the camera goes off with a flash of light, a startled face and much laughter.
    4. If the flash goes off, that person must do a quick forfeit (you decide!) before the game continues. Of course, random forfeits can also be awarded for not holding the camera long enough…

    Who wins? Anyone lucky enough to avoid the flash.

    Sombrero Dance

    In this fiesta game if you get caught with the sombrero you must eat a hot pepper!

    To play you’ll need a sombrero, music, fun loving players, and chili peppers. As your dancing to some festive music take the sombrero and place it on somebody else’s head, they then must place it on another’s head, and so on.

    When the music stops whoever last had the sombrero on must eat a pepper!

    Decorate your space!

    Don’t forget to make your space lively by adding some fun colors and decor! Check out what MexGrocer has to offer:

    Party Decorations

    Party Tableware

    Party Drinkware

    Enjoy your fiesta! And don’t forget to check out MexGrocer.com for more recipes, decorations, party favors, and ideas!

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    Beyond being delicious, Avocado (the main ingredient in guacamole, in case you didn’t know) is pretty nutritious. It packs a lot of calories, but eaten in moderation, it can be a healthy, and lip-licking delicious, eat! Check out just a few of the health benefits below:

    Avocado is a rich source of healthy fat. What is healthy fat, you ask? Healthy fats are monounsaturated fats which, according to the American Heart Association, decrease harmful LDL cholesterol, raise beneficial HDL cholesterol and last but not least, lower your risk of stroke and heart disease. One-half cup of guacamole contains 15 grams of fat. The majority, about 10 grams of the 15, is monounsaturated fat, the California Avocado Commission says. There are only 2 g of saturated fat, and no cholesterol.

    Finally, the avocado is an excellent source of vitamins B-6,C, K and Folate, and the minerals: copper and potassium. Folate is necessary for your body’s production of red blood cells, and it decreases your risk for cardiovascular disease. Vitamin C aids in healing by  increasing the absorption of calcium and iron,and  maintains healthy teeth, bones, gums and blood vessels. Vitamin B-6 is vital for the normal function of your neurological system, and potassium is necessary to maintain normal heartbeat and blood pressure. Avocado is high in oleic acid, which has been shown to prevent breast cancer in numerous studies.

    One-half cup serving of avocado also provides about 8 grams of Fiber, too. Fiber is found in all plant-based foods, and  promotes normal bowel function, reduces the risk for heart disease (a healthy heart is a happy heart!) and diabetes by lowering your glucose  and cholesterol levels, according to MayoClinic.com.

    According to Livestrong.com, “Avocados have more of the carotenoid lutein than any other commonly consumed fruit. Lutein protects against macular degeneration and cataracts, two disabling age-related eye diseases.”

    All in all, sounds like every day should be guacamole day!

    P.S. – This is a really cool website you should check out for tips, recipes, and facts about the amazing avocado.

    http://www.avocadocentral.com/nutrition

    Read more:

    1.  http://www.livestrong.com/article/290000-what-are-the-benefits-of-eating-guacamole/#ixzz2CEcuZqep

    2. http://www.beinglatino.us/lifestyle/health/more-than-guacamole-5-health-benefits-of-the-avocado/

    3. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/PreventionTreatmentofHighCholesterol/Know-Your-Fats_UCM_305628_Article.jsp

    4. http://www.avocado.org/avocado-nutrients/

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    Maybe some of you out there are like me. When it comes to cooking, I can hold my own, but when it gets down to the really good stuff, I’m pretty lost. That’s why I’ve taken an active interest in learning from the masters. Perhaps, like me, you’ve also never considered taking a cooking class — but in my research, cooking classes (even the online kind) are surprisingly pretty good deals.

    Here’s a few (online) cooking classes that you might like to check out:

    Epicurious Cooking School

    Mexican Cuisine: http://cookingschool.epicurious.com/c1-catalog-detail.php

    Cost: $49 for four hours of instruction, PLUS the first class is free!

    Lessons:

    • Overview and Salsas
    • Chiles
    • Moles
    • Tamales
    • Ceviches
    • Pork & Tortillas
    • Rice & Seafood
    • Beef & Beans

    Universal Class

    Tex-Mex Cuisine: http://www.universalclass.com/i/course/tex-mex-cooking-101.htm

    Cost: $30 for six-month subscription ($55 for a CEU Certificate)

    Lessons:

    • Tex Mex Cuisine
    • Classic Tex-Mex Recipes
    • Salsa, Rice, and Cheese
    • Pasta
    • Tex-Mex Flavors
    • Guacamole, Beans and Quesadillas
    • Beer Battered Fritters, Pizza, and Stuffed Cherry Tomatoes
    • Nachos, Beef and Chipotle Pasta, and Corn on the Cob
    • Chimichangas, Potato Bake, and Baked Chicken
    • Chili
    • Marinades, Soups, and Potatoes
    • Beverages

    Live Linga

      Mexican (Link: http://www.livelingua.com/mexican-cooking-classes.php)

      Cost: $99 for 4-5 hours of instruction (cooking and language instruction simultaneously)

      Lesson: (Choose one of four)

      1. Sopes – Salsa de Chipotle Molcajeta – Jamaica

      2. Tostadas de Tinga – Guacamole en Molcajete – Pepino con Limon

      3. Gorditas – Salsa Verde Molcajeta – Pina con Apio

      4. Mole – Enchiladas de Pollo/Queso -Tamarindo

      Happy Cooking!

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